Home » Who is Rubbin Sarpong?(Man pleads guilty in $1M online dating scam: Created fake profiles of deployed US soldiers to dupe 40 women and used the cash to buy property in Ghana ) Wiki, Bio, Age,Family,Facebook,Net Worth, Instagram, Twitter & Quick Facts
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Who is Rubbin Sarpong?(Man pleads guilty in $1M online dating scam: Created fake profiles of deployed US soldiers to dupe 40 women and used the cash to buy property in Ghana ) Wiki, Bio, Age,Family,Facebook,Net Worth, Instagram, Twitter & Quick Facts

Rubbin Sarpong

Rubbin Sarpong Wiki

                                       Rubbin Sarpong Biography

Who is Rubbin Sarpong ?

A New Jersey man admitted to running an online dating scam in which he created fake profiles posing as US soldiers on duty as supervisors and tricked 40 women into sending him more than $ 1 million over a period of two. years.

Rubbin Sarpong, 37, of Millville, used the stolen fortune to buy property in Ghana and often posted photos on social media showing wads of cash and newly purchased luxury cars, jewelry and designer clothes, according to documents. judicial.

Sarpong pleaded guilty in Camden federal court to conspiring to commit wire fraud, conspiring to commit money laundering and tax evasion, according to a press release from the U.S. District Court of New Jersey. Wednesday.

He allegedly conspired with three other men living in Ghana to convince his victims to send him money through various New Jersey bank accounts.

Victim

He and his conspirators told his victims that he was stationed in Syria and that he received, recovered or was awarded gold bars, but that he needed money to pay for his shipment to the United States. The crew told many of the victims that their money would be returned once the gold bars were received in the United States.

However, the gold bars never existed and Sarpong withdrew the cash before transferring it to national bank accounts and other conspirators in Ghana.

At least 40 identified victims transferred money to Sarpong and others in the United States, including 13 bank accounts controlled by Sarpong, some of which were in the names of their friends, family, and a fictitious business entity, Rubbin Sarpong Autosales.wikipedia

One of her victims took her own life shortly after Sarpong cheated on her with her scam, although he has not been charged with any crime related to her death.

One of Sarpong’s accomplices emailed a woman, whose identity was not disclosed, in May 2018 and pretended to be a diplomat named Alwin Rolf Lyss, prosecutors said when Sarpong was first indicted in September 2019.

The scammer told the victim that his overseas unit had found millions in gold bullion and that they gave him a box worth $ 12 million before asking the woman to send him money to help him bring the gold to the USA.

Death

One of Sarpong’s alleged victims sent his group $ 93,710 before committing suicide two days later, although Sarpong has not been charged with any crime related to her death.

Between May 22, 2018 and June 12, 2018, she sent the men an estimated $ 93,710 to two U.S. bank accounts.

Two days later, she was found dead from an apparent suicide. The victim’s daughter told investigators that her mother told her that she was going to the airport to meet her mysterious lover with the gold.

FBI agents said Sarpong and his co-conspirators used false or stolen identities and contacted their victims through dating websites, including Plenty of Fish, OurTime.com and Match.com, posing as members of the US military. stationed abroad in at least some cases.

“They contacted the victims through dating websites and then pretended to be romantically involved with them, courting them with words of love,” wrote FBI agent Dean J. DiPietro in sworn testimony.

“As part of their plan, the co-conspirators also created numerous Voice over Internet Protocol (hereinafter” VoIP “) email accounts and phone numbers, which they used to communicate with victims.

In some cases, the victims sent personal checks to Sarpong and her conspirators, and in others they transferred money through services such as Western Union and MoneyGram.

Her first victim paid him $ 10,000 on December 6, 2017, and she continued to send him money for the next month, giving him a total of $ 135,250 before moving on to her next fake relationship.

Sarpong cheated 39 other women out of tens of thousands of dollars each over the next two years, and the last payment of $ 700 from her came on June 5, 2019.

She received about $ 1.14 million in taxable income, but did not file income tax returns and pay no income taxes, resulting in a tax loss of $ 387,923, according to court documents.

Sarpong, who was identified

Sarpong, who was identified in court documents as a citizen of Ghana and a permanent legal resident of the United States, purchased property in Ghana during the scam and purchased several expensive cars, jewelry, and designer clothing.

Sarpong’s Instagram page is full of photos and videos of him showing off gold jewelry, Rolex watches, fancy dinners, and loads of money, plus high-end clothing, top-notch liquor, and luxury cars, using hashtags like #RichN. * ggaSh * t.

‘LivingHighLifeStyle … Let them hate #RichLifeStyle,’ he captioned a photo from August 13, 2018.

Instagram video

An Instagram video from September 20, 2017 shows a young boy smoking a hookah. Sarpong said the girl was his daughter.

‘I left my daughter for a minute to use the bathroom … now she looks what I came back and I see,’ he wrote in the caption of the video.

She has been watching me for a long time, ” he continued. I guess from now on we could start smoking together.

Sarpong, who is scheduled to be sentenced on March 21, 2022, agreed in his plea deal to make restitution for the full amount of money he amassed in the scam and to return the $ 387,923 in lost taxes to the Tax Service. Internal

For his conspiracy to commit wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering charges, Sarpong could face up to 20 years in prison and a $ 250,000 fine, or double the amount he made from the scam, whichever is greater, they say. court documents. For his tax evasion charge, he could face up to five years in prison and a $ 250,000 fine.

Sarpong also agreed to make a full refund to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the US Department of Agriculture, and the State of New Jersey for the Medicaid and SNAP benefits that he continued to use for himself and the children. of him from September 2018 to August 2019.

Rubbin Sarpong Quick and Facts

  • A New Jersey man admitted to running a $1M online dating scam that duped 40 women over a two-year period
  • Rubbin Sarpong, 37, of Millville, created fake profiles pretending to be U.S. soldiers serving oversees
  • He used their money to buy property in Ghana, luxury cars, jewelry and designer clothes that he posted photos of on Instagram
  • He told each victim that he needed money to ship gold bars to the states and would pay them back once they were received
  • However, the gold bars never existed and Sarpong withdrew the money in cash
  • One of his victims took her own life shortly after Sarpong duped her with his scam, though he has not been charged with any criminality related to her death
  • Sarpong will be sentenced on March 21, 2022 and could face up to 25 years in prison and $500,000 fine, in addition to paying full restitution

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