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A mother of two who is currently expecting her seventh surrogate child has vowed that this is the last pregnancy.

Ria Pawlow, 40, of Portsmouth, has helped three couples start a family and underwent a total of 13 rounds of IVF.

The care worker, who has two children from a previous relationship and shares two children with her partner Stacey, whom she married in September 2017, is due to be born on March 26, but admitted that she hopes the baby will be born earlier because she has diabetes. gestational.

It is the second time that she has developed the condition, and she nearly died during her fifth surrogacy when she retained her placenta, leaving her in intensive care and in need of a blood transfusion.
But she Ria herself insists that she ‘loves’ being pregnant and is currently campaigning for a change in the law to give more rights to parents of surrogate babies.

Appearing at Steph’s take out lunch today, Ella Ria explained, ‘I love being pregnant, I love feeling the baby move, giving birth is just amazing. I have no pain relief, I have been very lucky to have had natural deliveries so far, they have all been pretty easy. I have had a few complications, but I love the whole process.
“ Obviously when you are a mom, you know that feeling, when you give birth, you have this newborn child, the rush of love that you get, there are a lot of couples who can’t get that, I can’t have children.

So if I can do that for them, knowing how I feel for myself and knowing how to create that for other people is just phenomenal.

“I have created three families now, and every time I give birth with them in the room, I see their first moments with that child, it is just overwhelming.”

The care worker, who has two children from a previous relationship and shares two sons with her partner Stacey (pictured as a family), whom she married in September 2017, is due on March 26

When asked if she is concerned that she may feel too attached to the baby to later hand it over, she added: ‘With IVF everything is very medical, the embryo is placed when you are in the operating room, so everything is very clinical.

“For me, that’s a really good mindset, and I know the baby isn’t biologically mine anyway, so for me it really helps with the mindset of detaching myself from the bond with the baby.”

Ria, who affectionately refers to the babies in her womb as ‘tenants’, recounted how her wife Stacey is very supportive of her surrogacy journey and even helped give birth to two of the babies.

“I really couldn’t do it without her being with me,” she said. She helped deliver a couple of babies because the twins got to the front room floor a bit quick, which unfortunately Stacey had to deliver, bless her.

Ria, who affectionately refers to the babies in her womb as ‘tenants’, recounted how her wife Stacey is very supportive of her surrogacy journey, and even helped give birth to two of the +4 babies.
Ria, who affectionately refers to the babies in her womb as ‘tenants’, recounted how her wife Stacey is very supportive of her surrogacy journey and even helped deliver two of the babies.

‘Children are very receptive. Also, with any child, they only accept what you tell them, so as long as you tell them in basic terms, to the people you are meeting, they cannot have babies, they have a broken belly, so I’m going to carry the baby for them, they accept it, they understand it.

When she decided to become a surrogate, Ria joined the COTS Surrogacy UK agency, through which she met all three of her partners.

She is anxious about a change in the law, which currently states that biological parents of a surrogate baby cannot apply for a parental order until six weeks after her birth.

Ria’s last surrogate baby was born in December 2019, but court delays made worse by the Covid-19 pandemic meant that she continued to have official parental responsibility until September of last year.

“That is really hard on parents because they have no rights until the parental order is granted,” Ria explained on the Channel 4 show today.

Ria, during a previous pregnancy, is keen for a change in the law, which currently states that the biological parents of a baby born through surrogacy cannot apply for a parental order until six weeks after they’re born

‘So things like getting a passport if they wanted to do that, they can’t until they have the new birth certificate. And things like medical procedures: one of my surrogate babies had a frenulum, and there she had to email the London hospitals to go ahead and give her consent.

“ I was happy to give my permission for that to happen, it’s not my baby, it shouldn’t be my permission, but technically, legally on paper, it’s still my baby. These parents need more rights for their children. ‘

WHAT ARE THE UK SURGERY LAWS?
In the UK, surrogate mothers are the legal mother of any child they bear, unless they sign a parental order transferring their rights to the intended parents when they give birth.

The biological mother always has the right to keep her child, even if it is not genetically related.

It is illegal to pay a surrogate in the UK, except for medical expenses.

Ria had a son Matthew and a daughter Charlie before meeting Stacey in 2010. They used a sperm donor and Stacey later gave birth to her son Toby, followed by another son in 2018.

Ria’s first surrogacy embryo was implanted in October 2011, and in June 2012, Carl was born and weighed 9 lbs. 3 oz.

Ria suffered a miscarriage and four other failed embryo implants before she delivered 9-pound, 5-ounce baby boy Robert in 2014.

She said that she “sobbed her eyes out” when the new parents held her baby.

She gave birth to twins Max and Ruby prematurely in 2015 and began fertility treatment for her fifth surrogate daughter Daisy, who was born in July 2017, during their honeymoon.

Ria said: ‘While she weighed 8lb 8oz, I retained my placenta, leaving me in intensive care and needing a blood transfusion.

“The surgeon said I was lucky not to lose my uterus and need a full hysterectomy.”

Despite there being no surrogate pay and her near death experience, Ria continued to help families have children, and she has a star tattooed on her back for each surrogate baby.

She is being paid £ 15,000 in expenses for this pregnancy.

The Law Commission has produced proposals for a new law, but final recommendations will not be delivered to Parliament until 2022.

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