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Lisa Montgomery Wiki

                                  Lisa Montgomery Biography

Lisa Montgomery, 52, was pronounced dead at 1:31 a.m. Wednesday after receiving a lethal injection at the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. She was the 11th prisoner to receive a lethal injection there since July, when President Donald Trump, a fervent supporter of capital punishment, resumed federal executions after 17 years without one.

“The cowardly bloodlust of a failed administration was on display tonight,” Montgomery attorney Kelley Henry said in a statement. “Everyone who participated in the execution of Lisa Montgomery should be ashamed.”

“The government stopped at nothing in its zeal to kill this damaged and delusional woman,” Henry said. “The execution of Lisa Montgomery was far from justice.”

It came after hours of legal wrangling before the Supreme Court cleared the way for the execution to move forward. Montgomery was the first of the last three federal inmates scheduled to die before the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden next week, who is expected to suspend federal executions.

Causes of Death

The federal government sentenced Lisa Montgomery to death on Wednesday morning, the first time it has executed a woman since 1953.

She was killed by lethal injection in a federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. The 52-year-old woman was pronounced dead at 1:31 a.m., the Associated Press reported.

Montgomery was sentenced to death in 2008 for killing a pregnant woman in 2004 and stealing her fetus. The baby survived.

Montgomery is the 11th person to be executed by President Trump’s administration since July. Before that, the federal government had not executed anyone since 2003. The government killed Montgomery eight days before Joe Biden, an opponent of the death penalty, takes office.

“The cowardly bloodlust of a failed administration was on display tonight,” Kelley Henry, one of Montgomery’s attorneys, said in a statement.

On Montgomery’s behalf, dozens of petitions, pleadings and court challenges were made, and her lawyers and supporters argued that she was mentally incapacitated and in no condition to be executed.

Details of the crime at times left jurors in tears during her trial.

Prosecutors told jury that Montgomery drove approximately 170 miles (274 kilometers) from his farm in Melvern, Kansas, to the northwestern Missouri town of Skidmore, under the guise of adopting a rat terrier puppy from Stinnett. She strangled Stinnett by performing a crude cesarean section and fleeing with the baby.

Prosecutors said Stinnett regained consciousness and tried to defend himself against her when Montgomery cut the girl from her womb. Later that day, Montgomery called her husband to pick her up from the parking lot of a Long John Silver in Topeka, Kansas, and told him that she had delivered the baby that same day at a nearby birthing center.

Montgomery was arrested the following day after showing the premature baby, Victoria Jo, who is now 16 years old and has not spoken publicly about the tragedy.

Prosecutors said the reason was that Montgomery’s ex-husband knew she had undergone a sterile tubal ligation and planned to reveal that she was lying about being pregnant in an effort to gain custody of two of her four children. Montgomery, in need of a baby before the fast-approaching court date, focused on Stinnett, whom she had met at dog shows.

Anti-death penalty groups said Trump was pushing for executions ahead of the November elections in a cynical attempt to polish a reputation as a leader of law and order.

The last woman to be executed by the federal government was Bonnie Brown Heady on December 18, 1953, for the kidnapping and murder of a 6-year-old boy in Missouri.

The last woman to be executed by a state was Kelly Gissendaner, 47, on September 30, 2015 in Georgia. She was found guilty of murder in 1997 for the murder of her husband after she conspired with her lover, who stabbed Douglas Gissendaner to her death.

 

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IbrarHussain

Ibrar Hussain is the USA Today Bestselling author of 6 novels, including The Dig, A Warm Place to Call Home (a demon’s story), and Exigency. He lives in Northern California with “the wife,” “the kids,” “the dog,” “that cat,” and he occasionally wears pants. His latest release, RETURN, is the third book in his #1 bestselling Matt Turner series.

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