Home » Who is Laura DeMarco?(Remarkable colorized photographs capture the soldiers who fought in the Civil War and the conflict’s battlefields, prisons, forts, ships and encampments ) Wiki, Bio, Age, Instagram, Twitter & Quick Facts
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Who is Laura DeMarco?(Remarkable colorized photographs capture the soldiers who fought in the Civil War and the conflict’s battlefields, prisons, forts, ships and encampments ) Wiki, Bio, Age, Instagram, Twitter & Quick Facts

Laura DeMarco

Laura DeMarco Wiki

                                                            Laura DeMarco Biography

Who is Laura DeMarco ?

Laura Grace DeMarco is a professor of mathematics at Harvard University, whose research concerns dynamical systems and complex analysis. Wikipedia

Realizing there were fights near his home, Burns joined the fray. Wounded in his arm and leg, he convinced Confederate soldiers that he was an innocent bystander and crawled to safety.

“He became a popular hero in America,” explained author Laura DeMarco to DailyMail.com.

Poems were written and photographs were taken. In one photograph, shortly after the battle, the ‘Old Patriot’ sits barefoot in a rocking chair, his gun on the right and his crutches on the left. And while the Battle of Gettysburg and President Abraham Lincoln’s speech at the site of Pennsylvania (the Union victory there marked a turning point in the Civil War) are still well known, DeMarco noted that Burns, once famous story , has since faded.

This is one of the reasons the journalist wrote her new book, Lost Civil War: The Disappearing Legacy of America’s Greatest Conflict. It features rarely seen images, as well as some colored images of the battlefields, prisons, forts, ships, camps and soldiers of the conflict. Neglected, paved, or built, many places that once marked the war have now disappeared.

“The goal is to tell these lost stories,” she said.

How old is Laura DeMarco ?

November 15, 1974 (age 46 years), Japan

Confederacy attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina

The Civil War broke out on April 12, 1861 when the Confederacy attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina. But the friction between the North and the South over slavery had been brewing long before. The conflict was one of the first to be photographed extensively. A new book, Lost Civil War: The Disappearing Legacy of America’s Greatest Conflict, by journalist Laura DeMarco shows through images its camps, forts, buildings, prisons and battlefields, many of which have been lost due to development, interstate highways or neglect. Above, Union officers who ran the penitentiary that was part of the Washington Arsenal in Washington, D.C. in a photo from 1865. General John F. Hartranft is seated in the center

Harpers Ferry was “a pivotal place in the war,” DeMarco explained, adding that it changed hands between the Union and the Confederacy 14 times. “It was difficult to maintain and protect.” At the end of the war, the area was devastated. Above, a picture of the 22nd New York Infantry in Maryland Heights above Harpers Ferry from early in the war in 1862. It was taken by one of the war’s most famous photographers, Mathew Brady. “It illustrates his vital role in the war,” DeMarco said.

General Robert Ogden Tyler, standing second right, and the staff of the Artillery Reserve

General Robert Ogden Tyler, second from right, and Reserve Artillery personnel, photographed in Culpeper, Virginia, August-November 1863 by Timothy O’Sullivan, according to Lost Civil War. Tyler’s artillery batteries were active for the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. General Tyler was seriously wounded at the Battle of Cold Harbor in 1864, wounds from which he never fully recovered. He died in 1872 at the age of 42. DeMarco said this image of O’Sullivan “captured the humanity of his faces.”

In addition to the loss of life, cities were devastated. Above, ‘The Ruins of the Richmond & Danville Railroad Depot. Confederate President Jefferson Davis escaped on the last train to Danville around 11 p.m. the 2nd of April. He had received the telegram from Robert E. Lee advising him to leave town during Sunday morning church service. It wasn’t until 4 p.m. that afternoon the citizens of Richmond were informed of the government’s flight from him, according to a new book, Lost Civil War. The Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia fell on April 2, 1865. DeMarco told DailyMail.com that it was the Confederacy that destroyed the depot so that it would not fall into the hands of the Union. It caused “massive destruction,” he said, with many businesses and between 600 and 800 homes destroyed.

Union General William Tecumseh Sherman. DeMarco said he was controversial

Although the Civil War began on April 12, 1861 when the Confederacy attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, the foundations of the conflict were laid much earlier. The friction between the North and the South over slavery continued to grow as the United States expanded. The passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, which allowed slavery in the two territories, prompted abolitionists like John Brown to intensify their opposition.

In October 1859, Brown raided Harpers Ferry, then part of Virginia, because the armory stocked thousands of guns. The abolitionist hoped to use firearms and provoke a slave rebellion. Instead, he was captured, tried, and hanged that December.

DeMarco noted that during the war, Harpers Ferry changed hands between the Union and the Confederacy 14 times. It was “such an important place in the war,” he explained. “It was a transportation hub.”

But it was difficult to protect and by the end of the war, the area was devastated, DeMarco said. A black and white photograph evokes desolation when two men, one sitting and the other standing, are seen in the midst of destruction.

Another image from DeMarco’s new book, Lost Civil War, shows the 22nd New York Infantry over the arsenal early in the conflict in 1862. He noted that it was taken by one of the most important photographers of the Civil War, Mathew Brady. “It illustrates his vital role in the war,” DeMarco said.

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Born in 1822, Brady grew up in upstate New York and eventually moved to New York City. He opened a Broadway portrait studio in Lower Manhattan in 1844 that would become prominent. “Brady of Broadway” became the most recognized and admired photographic brand of the prewar era, “according to History.com.

By the 1850s, Brady had opened another studio in Washington, DC and took a now-famous photo of a beardless Abraham Lincoln when he ran for president in 1860. Lincoln was the candidate of the then relatively new Republican Party and reportedly He joked that he wouldn’t ‘They’ve been cast without the Brady portrait. Shortly after Lincoln won the White House, South Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Texas, and Florida seceded from the United States.

Brady hired photographers and assistants to chronicle the conflict. The photograph had been around since the 1820s, but the daguerreotype, named after its inventor Louis Daguerre, took until 1839 to become available to the public.

Although the first photographic techniques were used in the Mexican-American War (1846-’48) and the Crimean War of 1853, it was not until the Civil War that the horrific death toll of the battle was so vividly and extensively documented. . Instead of glorious paintings of Stoic generals and heroic troops, Civil War documentary makers captured the stark reality: broken bodies, scorched earth, mutilated horses, skeletal prisoners of war, and lifeless young faces, ” DeMarco wrote in Lost Civil War. .

“These were the first war photographs seen by a majority audience, shown across the country, printed in newspapers and viewed on 3D stereo cards, and the first to represent reality, not romance.”

DeMarco pointed out in his book that it is always difficult to take a photograph

In addition to the role photography played in revealing the brutal cost of the conflict, it also allowed families and loved ones to have souvenir portraits of the husbands, parents, children, siblings and fiancées who left to fight. This was due to the newer and easier to mass-produce photographic processes, ambrotype, which was printed on glass, and tin, which was printed on metal.

DeMarco pointed out in his book that it is always difficult to take a photograph in a war zone, but during the Civil War it was a cumbersome process. Because of this, the photographers had to “travel with their own cars and assistants, and makeshift darkrooms were quickly set up where space allowed,” he wrote in Lost Civil War.

“Many images of the Civil War are of the aftermath of the battle or of generals or troops resting (or perched) in camps. Many of the best preserved images are from Brady’s study; he sold more than 10,000 images to the United States government for $ 25,000 in 1875, to cover the debt he had incurred to establish his traveling team. ‘

Other photographers, such as George Barnard and Timothy O’Sullivan, also made their mark during the conflict. Barnard’s image of Twin Houses in Fair Oaks, Virginia, was a popular image. “It almost seems surreal,” DeMarco told DailyMail.com.

“My love of history probably started with my parents,” author Laura DeMarco told DailyMail.com. Growing up in Cleveland, her family would ‘pile into a pickup truck and go to a Civil War battlefield.’ Always interested in local history, the longtime journalist wrote her first book on Cleveland. Other books followed and Lost Civil War: The Disappearing Legacy of America’s Greatest Conflict is hers fourth.

In what was supposed to be a larger house, two wings were built, but the structure was never completed.

The Battle of Seven Pines took place there with a balance of 11,000 men, according to Lost Civil War. But this two-day battle in Henrico County, Virginia, on May 31 and June 1, 1862, is one of the most remembered because of a factor that had little to do with the fighting: the evocative images of the Twin Houses, ‘DeMarco wrote.

“ These buildings commemorated by George Barnard and other war photographers capture the bleak absurdity of war, as the two mirror houses loom over a decimated wasteland. ”

Barnard accompanied General William Tecumseh Sherman on his march to the sea. The Union general led 60,000 soldiers on a 285-mile march from Atlanta to Savannah from November 15 to December 21, 1864. According to History.com, the government “was fighting not only hostile armies, but hostile people. Sherman explained. ; as a result, they needed to “make old and young, rich and poor, feel the heavy hand of war.”

Sherman made his March to the Sea after the fall of Atlanta on September 2, 1864. In her new book, DeMarco noted the battles that took place in Georgia City and other places like Nashville. Since then, those battlefields and others have been lost to development. “The photographic records are the only place where many of these places still exist,” she wrote.

However, preserving the Civil War heritage is essential not only because of major events. It is important because the Civil War is still shaping American life to this day. It takes place in the middle of a debate over what remains and reminders of the past should be preserved or disposed of. ”

Laura DeMarco Quicks and Facts

  • The Civil War, April 12, 1861-April 9, 1865, was one of the first conflicts to be extensively photographed
  • The images bought home to the public the extent of the war’s loss of life and destruction 
  • A new book, Lost Civil War by Laura DeMarco, features images – both colorized and black and white – of soldiers and the conflict’s battlefields, forts and prisons. Many sites are now gone due to development

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