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Who is David Afanador Wiki, Bio, Age, Net Worth, Instagram, Twitter & More Facts

David Afanador Bio, Wiki

David Afanador ia an NYPD Officer who was Accused of Choking a Mentally-ill Man until he was unconscious during an Arrest. He has since been suspended from his job without pay, according to the NYPD.

David Afanador Age

His age will be updated soon

David Afanador Education, Career

Afanador has been an officer since January 2005, according to CAPstat, awebsite that collects data on New York police officers’ names, salaries, conduct histories and other data. Afanador operated out of the 77th precinct and worked in Queens.

He started out working less than 1,000 hours at a base pay of $42,488 and only eight hours of overtime, according to CAPstat. However, in the fiscal year of 2015, he worked 1,751 regular hours and 386 hours of overtime and was making $76,488 in salary.

David Afanador Chocking Mentally-Ill Man, Viral, Video

In the video, Afanador is seen chocking the Mentally-Ill man together with other three officers. Afanador told a bystander during the body cam footage, he had identified the man — before choking him — as someone that he knew he was bipolar from the man’s previous encounters with police. He said that the reason for the man being taken down was because the man had grabbed something and “square up”: “The minute I saw him flex on him, that’s when he goes down,” he said.

Officer Afanador, Badge # 31730 of the @NYPD100Pct @NYPDnews at Far Rockaway Beach performing an Illegal modern day lynching chokehold on a Black Man until he was unconscious. I demand his immediate firing & criminal charges for breaking the city & state ban. #DefundThePolice pic.twitter.com/wtAmYWxIbE

— Anthony Beckford (City Council Candidate)🌹 (@Vote4Beckford) June 21, 2020

David Afanador Suspension

After the incident, Afanador was suspended from his job without pay, according to the NYPD. According to NYPD’s Patrol Guide, Procedure 221-01 defines a chokehold as follows: “A chokehold shall include, but is not limited to, any pressure to the throat or windpipe, which may prevent or hinder breathing or reduce intake of air.” On page 3 of the document, the guide clearly states: “Members of the service SHALL NOT: a. Use a chokehold.

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea said in a tweet that Afanador had been suspended without Pay.

2/2

While a full investigation is still underway, there is no question in my mind that this immediate action is necessary.

We are committed to transparency as this process continues.

— Commissioner Shea (@NYPDShea) June 21, 2020

David Afanador Was Named In a Lawsuit

In court documents, Afanador was named along with four other officers in the 2009 case “Williams v. City of New York et al.”

In the complaint, a man named Ranique Williams alleged he was filming officers performing a strip search on someone else, and as a result, he was arrested and assaulted: Williams also alleged that he was “unnecessarily” dragged from the vehicle and thrown into a cell while was handcuffed.

Yes, another #NYPD bad apple cop… overpaid and abuse lawsuits cost NYC more money. Guessing he’s still helped and defended by the PBA.

https://t.co/4NMXloLIH4

— Ropebelt (@ropebelt) June 21, 2020

In 2016, he was again sued by Thomas Stevens, the father of Kaheem Tribble, who was 16 at the time that Stevens alleged Afanador and another officer, Tyrane Isaac, beat him. According to the New York Post, the two chased Tribble before he was cornered:

The video then shows a man ID’d as Isaacs and taking a swing at the teen, and Afanador lunging forward, gun drawn. Tribble testified the service weapon hit him in the mouth, breaking his two bottom teeth.

His attorney, Amy Rameau, told the New York Daily News, “These police officers behaved themselves in a truly deplorable manner. This type of conduct should not be tolerated and I want to see them prosecuted for what they did to my client.”

Afanador was also brought up on criminal charges by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office.

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported that Isaac, according to the district attorney, punched Tribble several times in the face while he was down on the ground: “The longer video clip, the investigation further revealed, allegedly shows that Afanador was locating and retrieving a bag of marijuana that Tribble allegedly tossed before running away, approaching the teen with the bag and allegedly striking him in the face with it.”

Tribble pled guilty to the marijuana possession charge for which he was originally arrested. “Clearly, [NYPD] Commissioner [Bill] Bratton has seen the video and reacted very aggressively in the sense of saying there have to be consequences when anything is done the wrong way,” Mayor Bill de Blasio told the Brooklyn Daily Eagle at the time.

Afanador and Isaac were found not guilty by a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge in 2016.

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IbrarHussain

Ibrar Hussain is the USA Today Bestselling author of 6 novels, including The Dig, A Warm Place to Call Home (a demon’s story), and Exigency. He lives in Northern California with “the wife,” “the kids,” “the dog,” “that cat,” and he occasionally wears pants. His latest release, RETURN, is the third book in his #1 bestselling Matt Turner series.

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