Home » Who is Briatney Portillo?(Doctors warn against TikTok ‘dry scooping’ challenge after influencer’s heart attack ) Wiki, Bio, Age,Family,Facebook,Heart Attack,TikTok, Instagram, Twitter & Quick Facts
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Who is Briatney Portillo?(Doctors warn against TikTok ‘dry scooping’ challenge after influencer’s heart attack ) Wiki, Bio, Age,Family,Facebook,Heart Attack,TikTok, Instagram, Twitter & Quick Facts

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TikTok user Briatney Portillo says she had a heart attack after dry scooping protein powder and is warning others of the dangers.

Doctors warned against the dangerous challenge of “dry shoveling” on TikTok and say it could kill children after an influential person suffered a heart attack.

The new deadly insanity is sweeping social media and shows no signs of abating, parents have been told.

“Dry Scooping” has gone viral on TikTok and sees users take a scoop of protein powder without diluting it with water.

The potentially fatal craze has garnered more than eight million likes on the video-sharing platform and has even led to an influencer suffering a heart attack.

Doctors warn that ingesting the powders alone can lead to heart and lung seizures, and even death.wikipedia

Nelson Chow, a Princeton University pediatrician who led a study on insanity, said it was a “particularly risky method of consumption.”

“Highly concentrated dust can cause suffocation, accidental inhalation, overuse injury and death,” he said.

“Despite being labeled 18+, pre-workout has become increasingly popular with teens.”

The team watched 100 TikTok videos with the hashtag “pre-workout” and found that only one in twelve showed how to ingest the powder correctly.

The new deadly insanity is sweeping social media and shows no signs of abating, parents have been told.

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“Pre-workout supplements have exploded in popularity in recent years,” Chow said.

“Taken before exercise, pre-workout is advertised to enhance athletic performance and increase energy and focus.

“Typically, pre-workout is sold in powder form, intended to be combined with water and consumed as a drink.”

It often contains high concentrations of caffeine and substances like Beta-Alanine, L-Cirtuline, and BCAAs.

Even more alarming is that the researchers found that people were taking the dangerous substances with energy drinks and alcohol, and often at extremely high levels.

In a warning, Chow said: “It can be difficult for clinicians to identify novel trends that may pose health risks among young people.

“Take, for example, the current pervasiveness of pre-workout and the dangerous methods of its consumption.

“Sometimes researching unorthodox platforms like TikTok can yield valuable results.”

Brush with death

It comes when Briatney Portillo, a TikTok influencer known for her workout clips, suffered a heart attack after “getting laid” before a gym session.

The social media star explained, “I just took pre-workout powder and ate it straight and tried to swallow it, and then followed it up with a drink of water.

“My hands and body started to itch shortly after, and then I started to sweat a lot.

“I started lifting weights and my chest felt a bit heavy and it hurt a bit. I ignored it because I assumed it was anxiety or a panic attack and continued with my training. ”

The student said that she then went home and that it was then that she began to experience nausea and gave her a headache.

She said: “I took a shower but still had nausea and a headache and couldn’t eat dinner.

“Still I decided to go to work, but at work the symptoms of heavy chest and chest pains came back but more intense.

“In the locker room I was sweating profusely again and my head hurt. The pain went to my back and my left arm.

“That’s when I knew it wasn’t anxiety and that maybe it was a heart attack.”

Briatney went to the hospital and was diagnosed with an NSTEMI heart attack.

According to the NHS, NSTEMIs are typically less harmful than other heart attacks.

“Adverse side effects”

Speaking to The Sun Myprotein PT, Chris Appleton explained that the trend “has no nutritional benefits.”

He said: “The only benefits you get from dry extraction are faster absorption rates; however, by doing this, you lose the benefits of flavor.

“You don’t get any nutritional benefit from dry extraction other than faster absorption.

“You should also be aware of the ingredients, as not diluting some products, for example, before training, will inject caffeine into your system much faster than normal and can cause adverse side effects.”

Shivraj Bassi, CEO and founder of Innermost said that the trend has “exploded” on TikTok.

He said: “The main risk of dry extraction is breathing in the dust and the dust clumps together in the throat, which increases the risk of suffocation and suffocation.

Also, some cheaper pre-workouts on the market contain high levels of caffeine.

“Taking them dry can put stress on your body, increase your heart rate, dehydration and more.

“Mixing your pre-workout with water helps increase the bioavailability of the ingredients, which should make it more effective if you take it before your workout.”

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